Review: A Quiet Place

Last year, my twitter went into meltdown when a film called ‘Get Out’ was released. Everyone was saying how badly I NEEDED to see this film. Fast forward to 2018, ‘A Quiet Place’ was emulating the same buzz. Touted as one of the tensest films of recent memory, as well as making more people annoyed about popcorn munching, this was probably the most excited I’ve been for film that’s not a “nerd” one since ‘Three Billboards…’. Thankfully, the film mostly lives up to the insanely high expectations it’s received, and is easily one of the best cinematic experiences you’ll see all year on the big screen.

The film has one of the best premises of any horror ever, and they make full use of it.  

The films centres around a family who live in a world ravished by death. There are unknown creatures that hunt and kill, but the catch is they do this based on sound. This forces said family to live out their lives in isolation and silence. Now, while some may see this as a gimmick, the idea is used for the full 90 minutes. There is very little talking and there really is next to no sound. Instantly, it put you on edge. Every simple task is made that much worse knowing a simple drop of something minuscule could mean death. The film has one of the best premises of any horror ever, and they make full use of it. I’d say there’s only around ten minutes when I wasn’t gripping the armrest.

‘A Quiet Place’ is one of those films you have to see at the cinema.  

Of course, creating tension doesn’t work if you don’t have acting making it all believable. Krasinski and Blunt are absolutely stunning. They elevate every scene and make the film much more than a horror, both showing how far a parent would go to protect their own. Millicent Simmonds and Noah Jupe are both excellent young actors who more than hold their own too. In a film that relies so heavily on a limited cast, it’s impossible to single any one person out for praise, they’re all magnificent. It’s also brilliant to see the role of a deaf character be given to a deaf actor, as films still tend to not cast disabled roles in this way.

Krasinski’s direction has the flare of a seasoned horror expert, not someone whose never been associated with the genre before.  

‘A Quiet Place’ is one of those films you have to see at the cinema. The tension is unbearable at times and never in a cheap way. Krasinski’s direction has the flare of a seasoned horror expert, not someone whose never been associated with the genre before. The sound editing and mixing also deserve a lot of the praise that’s being heaped on this film. Knowing exactly when to use the score and how to utilise generic sounds to terrifying effects means you’re on the edge of your seat for the long haul. ‘A Quiet Place’ is a film that deserves your full attention so if you are someone who partakes in food whilst watching a film, consider against it. Watch this film makes you feel scared to make a sound. I shuffled my leg a little to the left a lot slower than I usually would’ve. It’s a really astounding film. Go and see it before ‘…Infinity War’ takes up all the screens.

9/10

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